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Author Topic: Heya  (Read 2763 times)

Naryoril

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Heya
« on: December 27, 2011, 11:19:32 am »
Heya everyone, let's start with the more formal stuff ;)

Sex: M
Country of Origin: Switzerland
Age (upon joining): 28
Hobbies: iaido, video games, riding on my motorbike, reading, anime/manga

=Q&A=

Q: How did you come across this site?
A: Some Idolm@ster SP guide mentioned it

Q: Why did you join this site?
A: I'm really into Im@s currently, and i'm a forum junkie

Q: Do you play it?
A: Yep, i do. 2 months after the release of Idolm@ster 2 on the PS3 i'm on my 5th playthrough with about 95 hours spent with the game

Q: Who is your fave idol?
A: definitely Yukiho, the second place is shared between Hibiki and Miki

Q: Why is your username "Naryoril"?
A: I don't know how many years ago i started playing Ultima Online on a free shard. My first (and only serious) character, which i ended up playing for 5 years, had this name (it was an elf and the name came from a name generator). I stuck with it because this name has NEVER ever been used by anyone else, so if i want to register on a website and it says it's already in use, i know it was me and i can try to log in ;)

Q: What are you in to right now?
A: Im@s ;)

Q: What is your motto?
A: There are 2:
1) "The world ends with you. If you want to enjoy life, expand your world. You gotta push your horizons out as far as they'll go." - Sanae Hanekoma, The World Ends With You
2) "Tu etwas ganz oder gar nicht", i think the best translation (not literally) would be "Do something with all your heart, or don't do it at all"

Q: Who's your favorite singer(s) right now?
A: Honestly i'm not really into music, especially not into single artists/bands. I often listen to JPop on J1 FM

Q: What are you up to right now?
A: I'm just on a break at work

Q: Do you have any expectations from this site?
A: Having interesting discussions about the franchise and learning stuff about the startegy


A bit about my Idolm@ster history:
Ever since i learned about the game i'd have loved to try it out, but i didn't want to buy a console only for it (a japanese XBox 360 or later on a PSP). When i found out the games are available as download titles in the japanese XBox markteplace i was happy and hoping i could avoid the region lock, so i bought (overpriced) japanese MS points just to find out the download version also has a region lock. I researched a bit and found out that the XBox apparentely uses your IP to find out in which region you are for download titels. So i went through great lengths to connect my laptop with a japanese VPN to get a japanese IP and then connect my XBox through my laptop, so my xbox also had a japanese IP. Only to find out that at least Im@s also checks the region on your console, why the hell ever they do it for a game like this they never intend to release outside of Japan...

A while later Dearly Stars was released and i imported it. In the end i didn't play much, because i didn't get at all how it worked and i couldn't find any information on the net on how to play it.

I didn't import SP either, because i didn't own a PSP.

When i found out that Idolm@ster 2 was announced for the PS3, which doesn't have a region lock, i started thinking about getting a PS3. When Ni no Kuni and Tales of Graces F got an announcment for an english release and the price was slashed a few months ago i decided to get a PS3 and orderd Idolm@ster 2 for it. I wasn't disappointed by the game, i was even surprised on how much fun it is and i'm set on getting the platinum trophy for it.

When they released the new PSP model (the one without WiFi) i also bought a PSP, because it was pretty cheap and ordered Idolm@ster SP: Wandering Star, it should arrive here today or tomorrow, i also intend to give Dearly Stars another shot (but before i get into the handheld Im@s games i want to finish Tales of the Abyss on the 3DS).

On a side note: About 13 years ago i'v been taking japanese lessons and in the mean time i intended to pick it up again several times by self studying, but i never stuck to it. After playing Im@s 2 i decided to finally get back to it. My goal ist to be able to read light novels, understand games, animes and Shizufumi Ishido-sensei (a 8th Dan Hanshi iaido sensei that sometimes comes to Europe to teach the iaidoka here), so i picked up the self study again and in about a month a japanese class i enlisted to will start. I intend to join that class until a private teacher i asked has a free spot, because private lessons can be tailored to my own abilities and goals (which is largely understanding japanese, and less speaking/writing, with a higher empaphis on non formal language than you'd have in a class)

PinoyCruger

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Re: Heya
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2011, 02:44:29 pm »
Project-iM@s e yōkoso! (or Welcome to Project-iM@S!)
---FILIPINO PRIDE AND PROUD SINCE 1989---

THIS WEEK: This is THE IDOLM@STER, the idol game where Kachou Fuugetsu (Chihaya and Takane) gets a crazy-free lion dance.

Twitter: PinoyCruger

Me at Figure.fm

12/23 - Domo arigato, 765PRO!

blake307

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Re: Heya
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2011, 04:07:18 pm »
I see you are a Yukiho fan as well. Any Yukiho fan is a friend of mine. :)

Welcome to Project im@s.

satty

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Re: Heya
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2011, 04:53:50 am »
Welcome to the forums. How's Switzerland?

A Yukiho and a Hibiki/Mami fan? Good, good.
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animagic4u

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Re: Heya
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2011, 05:11:57 am »
Welcome~ Enjoy your stay here.

Naryoril

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Re: Heya
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2011, 09:39:59 am »
Welcome to the forums. How's Switzerland?

A Yukiho and a Hibiki/Mami fan? Good, good.

thanks
unfortunately it's cold and foggy and there is no snow, at least where i live

but sorry to (maybe) disappoint you, it's not Mami, it's Miki ;)

satty

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Re: Heya
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2011, 12:59:52 pm »
Ah...where I live, it's pretty random weather. With no snow all year.

And my mistake, I should have read what you wrote more carefully. Still, enjoy your stay here.
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Cael K.

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Re: Heya
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2012, 11:44:12 am »
Hobbies: iaido

So, I always meant to ask this, but I keep on forgetting.

What sort of martial principles are there in iaido? I mean, there's probably some theory behind what you're doing, I was just wondering if you noticed anything or could tell. For instance, I could say that Baguazhang usually involves circling around a central point, mainly on eight different points on that circle, or something. (Unfortunately, that's about all I could tell you about Baguazhang.) That sort of stuff.
Cael's Im@s Ranking: Azusa, Yumeko, Tomomi, Haruka

How to get stuff from Japan without causing things to explode in a shower of sparks and misery: http://forum.project-imas.com/index.php/topic,1108.0.html

Memories of Melon Pan: http://d.hatena.ne.jp/caelk/
Translations: http://www.mediafire.com/?hzc4b0jy7pwll

Currently translating (text only):
S(mile)ING! (English version, singable) - http://d.hatena.ne.jp/caelk/20140911/1410422445
Neue Green, Volume 3 - Will start sometime. ^_^;;
Rockin' Girl, Volume 1 (Chapters 1-5) - http://www.mediafire.com/?z00ffkvg5ocg11e

Naryoril

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Re: Heya
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2012, 01:07:42 pm »
No, there are no such principles that i am aware of. I'm only 1st Dan though, maybe there are, but they are not tought until a much higher level. And if there are i guess they will depend on the style.

In the end, iaido isn't actual fighting. It developed during a time of peace (during the Tokugawa shogunate) as means for samurai to train with the sword as they couldn't do so in war. This is also reflected in it's name, iaido is written as 居合道, the kanji meaning "to be", "meet" and "way". You could translate it into something like "the way to meet the essence of being" and thus iaido is, in my personal interpretation, mainly a fight against yourself, your own body, your own mind with the goal to perfect yourself.
In iaido you don't fight against someone, you only perform katas (forms) and kill imaginary opponents. Due to that you can use metal swords (at first they are not sharp, but about from 4th dan onwards you can use sharp swords, an i think if you take the exam for 7th dan you must use a sharp one). The difficulty is to make fast, precise movements that look completely effortless. Thus if someone who doesn't know iaido watches it they usually think "that's easy", until they try it themselves. It really is a fight against yourself.
On the other hand, all katas have their scenario. What they all have in common is that the sword is sheathed at the beginning and the end of a kata. If you want you could take a principle "You can draw your sword under any cricumstance and attack/defend immediately", be it standing, sitting, between narrow walls, below a house, when you attack suddenly, when you are attacked suddenly and so on. Thus the movements you do with your sword are extremely diverse and the angles vary also as much as you like (though i don't know of a vertical upwards cut, since it doesn't make sense to do so). Quite often you also hit your opponent with your katana's hilt.

I hope that was more or less what you wanted to know ;)

baruhara

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Re: Heya
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2012, 07:49:40 pm »
In the end, iaido isn't [...] hilt.

Huh... That sounds strikingly similar to Shotokan Karate, except obviously without a weapon. Do you ever have occasional sparring with other people practicing iaido, like I do with karate, or is it all kata-oriented?

In any case, I envy you for having the oppertunity to do something that I want to. I don't think there are any facilities that offer any kind of weapons training around here, let alone iaido.
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Naryoril

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Re: Heya
« Reply #10 on: January 03, 2012, 08:01:28 pm »
Huh... That sounds strikingly similar to Shotokan Karate, except obviously without a weapon. Do you ever have occasional sparring with other people practicing iaido, like I do with karate, or is it all kata-oriented?

In any case, I envy you for having the oppertunity to do something that I want to. I don't think there are any facilities that offer any kind of weapons training around here, let alone iaido.

No, we don't have sparring sessions, it would simply be way too dangerous. From time to time we fool around with shinais after the training, but that doesn't have to do anything with iaido. Sometimes we practice some kata (especially those that start with a defence) with a bokken, but i wouldn't call that sparring, it's more like a simple coreography to help to understand the situation in which you could use the kata.
Thus iaido requires a quite specific mindset, it's not for everyone. You can see that quite well in the big seminars, where people from all around europe come together (about 150 to 250 people) to train for a weekend, with 6th to 7th dan teachers from the whole continent, and sometimes even an 8th dan from Japan.

It depends where you live. At least in europe there are more iaido clubs than you'd think, but they usually only have a few people training iaido, so it often is a sub section of some other budo club (for example ours also has karate and judo). Just google for it.

baruhara

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Re: Heya
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2012, 08:17:44 pm »
No, we don't have sparring sessions, it would simply be way too dangerous. From time to time we fool around with shinais after the training, but that doesn't have to do anything with iaido. Sometimes we practice some kata (especially those that start with a defence) with a bokken, but i wouldn't call that sparring, it's more like a simple coreography to help to understand the situation in which you could use the kata.

Oh, I see. That makes a lot of sense, actually! Thank you for clarifying.

Thus iaido requires a quite specific mindset, it's not for everyone. You can see that quite well in the big seminars, where people from all around europe come together (about 150 to 250 people) to train for a weekend, with 6th to 7th dan teachers from the whole continent, and sometimes even an 8th dan from Japan.

That sounds very admirable. I love disciplines that require a lot of focus and concentration, because then you don't get the people who aren't taking it seriously. Having something you can put 100% into is actually rather cathartic.

It depends where you live. At least in europe there are more iaido clubs than you'd think, but they usually only have a few people training iaido, so it often is a sub section of some other budo club (for example ours also has karate and judo). Just google for it.

I'll do just that, thank you for the advice.

Edited For: A typo.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2012, 09:59:31 pm by baruhara »
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Cael K.

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Re: Heya
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2012, 11:49:45 am »
I hope that was more or less what you wanted to know ;)

Heh... really late on these replies here, but thanks. ^^

You do anything special when swinging a sword around, though? Can't be all arm strength, I imagine there's wrist torque involved... and maybe a certain measure of letting the thing swing itself if you've made it go that fast? I mean, I've only heard of doing that with those heavy two-handers, get them going and your hands are only there for guidance, but dunno what all you do for the fast, powerful, and accurate cut.
Cael's Im@s Ranking: Azusa, Yumeko, Tomomi, Haruka

How to get stuff from Japan without causing things to explode in a shower of sparks and misery: http://forum.project-imas.com/index.php/topic,1108.0.html

Memories of Melon Pan: http://d.hatena.ne.jp/caelk/
Translations: http://www.mediafire.com/?hzc4b0jy7pwll

Currently translating (text only):
S(mile)ING! (English version, singable) - http://d.hatena.ne.jp/caelk/20140911/1410422445
Neue Green, Volume 3 - Will start sometime. ^_^;;
Rockin' Girl, Volume 1 (Chapters 1-5) - http://www.mediafire.com/?z00ffkvg5ocg11e

Naryoril

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Re: Heya
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2012, 12:44:09 pm »
Heh... really late on these replies here, but thanks. ^^

You do anything special when swinging a sword around, though? Can't be all arm strength, I imagine there's wrist torque involved... and maybe a certain measure of letting the thing swing itself if you've made it go that fast? I mean, I've only heard of doing that with those heavy two-handers, get them going and your hands are only there for guidance, but dunno what all you do for the fast, powerful, and accurate cut.

You have a tendency for hard questions :D How to make a good cut... i tried to explain that to a 2 "beginners" (one of them has been practicing for one and a half years now) and it's hard to explain even if you can show stuff, written is even harder as you can imagine, but i'll try.

Generally there is one big difference between a european two-hander and a katana: a two hander is (afaik) more of a blunt weapon, a katana is sharp, it's a large knife. If you swing a two-hander at an enemies upper arm (assuming it's not protected) the arm will be broken due to the weight and power of the blow, maybe even torn off. If you do the same with a katana, it will be cleanly cut off.

A good cut with a katana doesn't require power, it needs a good CUTTING technique and speed helps with that. I'll try an example to help you imagine what i mean: if you want to cut an apple with a knife you can put the knife on the apple and just press the knife through the fruit with sheer force. Or you can move the knife back and forth to cut with much less effort. The latter is what makes it a cut. In training we often compare the former method with using an axe to chop wood.

Thus you need a movement in a 90° angle to your cut. Let's assume a standard cut from over your head (In this stance you have the hilt over your head and the sword is pointing back and slightly upwards) vertically downwards. For this cut you need a movement forwards and then backwards. While you hold the sword over your head you only have a light grip on the hilt. The first thing you do is to tighten the grip with your left hand and turn the left wrist forwards. This causes the tip of the sword to move forward. Only after this movement has started you start moving your arms downwards. By the point where you would hit the opponents head, the movement with the left wrist must be completed and the arms slightly stretched, from there it is just a movement with the arms. Due to the circle your arms perform in this movement you get the required forwards and backwards movement. Take a stick or something in your hand (right hand in front of the left) and try it for yourself, it might help to understand it.

As we obviously don't have an opponent in iaido we need to stop the sword again, where depends on the cut/kata. The standard cut stops on the horizontal. The sword tip must be the fastest (and thus make the loudest sound) when you hit the opponent, in this case where the head would be. It's no coincidence that this is the moment where the movement to turn the sword with your wrist is finished at that moment, because the accelaration of the tip comes to an end at that moment. From there you can let the sword move a bit or already start stopping it (honestly i don't know, cleanly stopping the cut is one of the points i'm currently working at).

One thing to add is that all the power and speed of a two handed cut cut comes only from the left arm. The right arm is only there to change the direction (for a diagonal cut for example) and to help stopping the sword (which woulnd't be necessary if there actually was an opponent, his flesh would do that for you ;) ). The katana is a one-and-a-half-handed sword, you can use it with two hands or with one hand. If you use one hand you always use your right hand afaik.

So the short answer would be: A katana cut must be fast and accurate, but not powerful. You use the left hand for the "fast" (and "correct"), the right hand for the "accurate". There is no letting go, as your cuts aren't that long, once you have hit the top speed it's already time to stop it again. But that's only possible with the katana because it's much lighter than a two handed sword (mine is a bit over 1kg, and it is a really heavy one).
Arm strength is hardly involved, but wrist movement is.

I hope that was somehow understandable.

Cael K.

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Re: Heya
« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2012, 10:30:00 am »
Alright, yeah. Honestly, I think nunchaku uses roughly the same mechanics - or maybe even emphasizes part of what you're talking about. I understand it's a one-hander, but I remember being told that the mechanics were similar to stick and sword (and that's why it was taught first) - you have to fling them with your wrist as you strike down, otherwise there's really no impact and the thing goes wild. Moreover, the wrist snap only happens when you need to make the impact, 'cause you need to make the attacking part snap down where you intend to strike - kinda sounds like what's going on here. I never really thought about this until now, though... it's probably a very universal motion (the horizontal strikes are likely a bit different than sword, though).

So, two other questions if you're not tired of them already. ^^ First, when using the right hand to stop the sword... how is that done? I mean, I tried it a while ago, and the sword tends to wiggle a bit when I try and stop it (or rather, specifically because I try and stop it). I think I tried gripping it tight to stop it, then I just tried stopping my right hand from moving, but I guess it doesn't like stopping without a bit of swaying to the sides.

Second, I'm thinking that the cutting motion you're describing involves a forward cut (as opposed to a strike, and a pull back)? Does that sound right?

All in all though, thanks for the replies. They've been enlightening.
Cael's Im@s Ranking: Azusa, Yumeko, Tomomi, Haruka

How to get stuff from Japan without causing things to explode in a shower of sparks and misery: http://forum.project-imas.com/index.php/topic,1108.0.html

Memories of Melon Pan: http://d.hatena.ne.jp/caelk/
Translations: http://www.mediafire.com/?hzc4b0jy7pwll

Currently translating (text only):
S(mile)ING! (English version, singable) - http://d.hatena.ne.jp/caelk/20140911/1410422445
Neue Green, Volume 3 - Will start sometime. ^_^;;
Rockin' Girl, Volume 1 (Chapters 1-5) - http://www.mediafire.com/?z00ffkvg5ocg11e